WELCOME!


It is hard to believe that it was only six years ago I witnessed a CNC router in action for the very first time. I was fascinated and simply had to have one! Although I had been in the creative end of the three dimensional sign business for most of my life I didn't really know what I would do with one - but I just knew it could do fantastic stuff.

Through extensive research I quickly found out that with the relative simplicity of EnRoute, CNC routers were capable of just about anything imaginable. This journal will chronicle that journey to date and continue each week with two or three entries as we continue to explore just what is possible with this wonderful software... -dan

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Building a train - Part seven


The train is coming along nicely. The bulk of the frame, tank and cab is welded steel.  Now it is time to fire up the MultiCam once more and do the many details we need.


Today's project was the steam cylinders that power the geared engine. This kind of complex shape is fun to create in EnRoute. I first had to build the vectors I would require for each relief. The reliefs would mostly be built separately and then merged after being nudged vertically into position. We would use a variety of procedures for the task.




For the top of the cylinders I created meshes using the revolve tool. I then duplicated the mesh before merging it to a zero height relief.




The valve box was built as a separate relief as were the end caps. These were nudged into position (relative to the cylinders) Then I modified the valve box relief by adding the oblong shape and the rivets.




Then I created a zero height relief and merged highest, everything to it.


Using the slice tool I cut off the zero height relief.


The connecting rod covers were the next task. First I created a flat relief.


To add slope to the flat reliefs I used the sweep two rails tool to create a slope mesh. I merged this to the flat relief by adding to.


Then I created the bracing flanges (also a flat relief.)  These and everything else was nudged vertically (in the front and side views) until everything looked good. Then I created a zero height relief Everything was once again merged highest to this flat relief. Using the slice tool removed the flat relief when I was done.



Next I added the rivets by modifying the base relief.


The bottom bits were then built as separate reliefs, also nudged into position vertically and then merged highest with a zero height relief.





Lastly I sliced the assembly into three layers (to fit in 1.5" thick Precision Board) then tool pathed the file and sent it to my MultiCam.


The file was finished just at quitting time today. I'll document the assembly tomorrow and show how it all fits together. Stay tuned...

-dan